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Olaf Olsson
Jabots, Bow Ties, and Bad Asses

Jabots, Bow Ties, and Bad Asses

ja·bot/ZHaˈbō,ˈZHaˌbō/noun an ornamental frill or ruffle on the front of a shirt or blouse, typically made of lace. bow tie/ˈbō ˌtī/noun a necktie in the form of a bow or a knot with two loops. bad·ass/ˈbadˌas/Noun tough, uncompromising, or intimidating. The Jabot It would seem easy to assume that the bow tie derives its name from it’s “bow like” look, but you would be wrong. The bow tie actually derives its name from the French version of the cravat, or jabot (pronounced “ja-bow”). It’s pretty hard to imagine the jabot as badass, as it was a frilly lace thing of...

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Olaf Olsson
Sensu, Hanakatoba, Seigaiha, and Colorful Neckwear.

Sensu, Hanakatoba, Seigaiha, and Colorful Neckwear.

We love Japanese fabrics that are chock full of imagery and meaning. The "Fans & Flowers" necktie and batwing bow tie by Olaf Olsson are no exception. The fabric we used for this neckwear includes folding fans, four different flowers, and a wave motif, all of which have deep meaning and long histories in Japan. Sensu Folding fans, known as Sensu, have been an important part of Japanese culture for hundreds of years. While the folding fan itself has a practical use on hot days, it also has a deeper symbolic meaning and use in Japan. It can be seen...

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Olaf Olsson
Kasuri: the Traditional Art of Japanese Dyeing and Weaving.

Kasuri: the Traditional Art of Japanese Dyeing and Weaving.

Traditional Japanese Kasuri fabrics are created using a method of weaving together threads that have a pattern dyed into them. The patterns are created using a resist dyeing technique known as Ikat. This resist dying technique is combined with traditional indigo dye making to create the distinctive blurry edge patterns that make Kasuri textiles so unique and beautiful.  Kasuri textiles made their way to Japan from China in the 8th century. Some of these extraordinary early examples of Chinese Kasuri are preserved at the National Shosoin Repository in Japan. But it wasn't until the 18th century that Kasuri dying and...

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Olaf Olsson
Mount Fuji, Hokusai, and Olaf Olsson Neckties and Batwing Bow Ties

Mount Fuji, Hokusai, and Olaf Olsson Neckties and Batwing Bow Ties

Mount Fuji is the tallest mountain in Japan. It lies 60 miles to the south-west of Tokyo and on a clear day it is possible to see the snow capped peak of the mountain from the city. Mount Fuji, with its perfectly symmetrical cone, is one of the sacred symbols of Japan. It is also a religious center and is surrounded by temples and shrines and thousands of people come to the mountain every year to visit and climb this majestic natural wonder. The mountain has inspired great artists and photographers to try to reproduce it’s beauty. The most famous...

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